Thursday, 4 May 2017

Adding To The Flock

Typical after I hatched out some chicks in the incubator 3 weeks ago we now have two broodies, they have been broody for the past week, unfortunately the chicks we have are too old to adopt over.
 They are feathering up at a rate of knots this week end they will be moving into there teenage pad then I can start weaning them off the heat lamp over the coming weeks.
Back to the broodies, I could have sent them to chicken jail to cool off, but thought I would put them use and put a call out on the local social media smallholders group for some fertile Ross Cobb eggs
I have been wanting to rear Ross Cobbs for the past couple of years, they are a great table bird, in fact those supermarket chickens 2 for £10 or what ever it is, are Ross Cobbs culled at 6-8 weeks.
They are fed a particular feed to make them grow big and heavy very fast. That isn't how I want to do it.
In readiness I set up a couple of broody coops.

 No matter how many leads I followed it seems there wasn't eggs available locally people seem to buy in at day old chicks, speaking with one farmer who had some 2 day old chicks he suggested putting the chicks under the broodies and offered to sell me some at £2 each.
He suggested moving the broodies into there new homes with a couple of eggs under them, then wait until its getting dark and slip the chicks under them and remove the eggs.

 So that is what I have done this tonight, one broodie has 6 and the other one has 4.
Tomorrow morning will tell if it has all been successful or if I have a lot of dead chicks, one of the broodies started purring I am hoping that is a good sign. 

16 comments:

  1. We used to buy in 50 at a time of day old cobbs and raise them under a lamp 'til they were off heat. then outside in the orchard. tasted delicious at about 3 months old - never had chicken like it since

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If it works out well then next year we may get in about 50

      Delete
  2. Well they must have been very surprised chickens hatching so soon! x

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hope the outcome is good on your little chickies-x-

    ReplyDelete
  4. Fingers crossed, lovely tip from the farmer.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wow...this is like Greek to me, but thank you for the post, it's helping me to learn a lot about chickens. I hope the "broodies" take to the chicks! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. every day I learn something new

      Delete
  6. I would guess that the purring is indeed a good indication Dawn. I used to dabble in this a few years ago. I think one of the reasons people don't put eggs under (certainly the reason I stopped) is that such a large percentage turn out to be cockerels. But if you are rearing them for the table then I expect this is a good thing isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I dont mine some being hatched but I really want some good meat birds

      Delete
  7. I hope it worked! I've had great success with exactly that method of grafting chicks onto broodies. Good thing chickens can't count (either eggs or days!)

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is great to read and thank you for your offer to help us out if you manage to get some laying - I'm pleased to say that our "lead" has finally came through and we're picking the ross cobbs up on Saturday so I will be following you with huge interest!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. exciting I am please you managed to get some

      Delete

Thank you for taking the time and leaving a comment I do appreciate it, I may not always answer comments but I do read them all.